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Those Fleeting Little Things

Youth is ephemeral, and catching every special moment is important. But more so than the moments, I find I am loving, and missing the adorable habits and ticks that continually pop up and then disappear a week later.

It’s exciting when your baby learns a new trick. It might be a new syllable of speech, or it might be clapping their hands for the first time; and I expected to see them and dote over them as my boys developed. What I didn’t expect was that so many of them would only be temporary 😦

Myles discovered one day that he could make a clicking sound by popping his tongue off the roof of his mouth. He LOVED this trick. loved his trick. I’d click at him, and he’d actually respond in kind! It was our first little bit of verbal communication, and it felt so special.

And then one day, less than two weeks later, he just stopped. He’d moved onto the next new thing; babbling “ma, ma, ma, ma…” I think (which itself only lasted about a week). I was so sad to have that special little thing with Milo go away.

Sure, I could teach him how to click again after he’s older and understands instructions, but I feel it won’t be the same. It would feel too forced. It would be my thing and not his anymore.

All I can do is enjoy them while they last, and record them for memory in places like my blog. So here’s my list:

  • Remington used to hold his own feet while doing a diaper change.
  • Myles used to log roll to get to his destination, before he learned how to crawl.
  • Remi currently will take an item in his mouth and carry it across the room like a dog.
  • Myles used to stick his finger so far down his mouth after nursing that he’d sometimes gag himself.
  • Remi used to have his tongue out ALL THE TIME. Almost 24/7, when he wasn’t sucking on his pacifier.
  • Both Remi and Milo would do that “Indian call” when you tapped your hand or fingers over their mouths. Now only Milo still does it.
  • Both will smile so big that their eyes go all squinty; however Remington makes this particular face more than Myles.
  • Remington has always liked to rough-house, but Myles was so sweet that he’d cry whenever I pretended that he was “beating dad up.” I think by now he knows it’s not real.
  • They still love to be tickled, they think it’s funny when they bite your finger and you say “ouch!”, they will sit in front of each other for 10 minutes straight stealing one another’s paci and popping it in their own mouth, and they will naturally prefer any phone, remote control or power-cord over whatever toy you may try to offer.
  • Myles likes to do what I call “singing,” where he takes a deep breath and then just holds one long note for, like, 20 seconds. It’s just a step under screaming, but you can tell he’s just enjoying hearing himself drone on like a bagpipe.
  • Remi has begun to practice throwing a ball. He just bounces it on the ground in front of him, but it’s a good start.
  • Remi will raise both hands up in the air. This has become his indicator for more food or just to get our attention.
  • Both of them are learning how to clap. Myles has been going through the motions for about a month now, but Remington is just now catching on. One time, when he was supposed to be taking his nap, Jessica and I caught Remi sitting awake and practicing his hand clapping in his crib.

Some of these thing may fade, other may stick around for the long haul, but I expect I’ll miss most of them when they’re gone. I can’t say I haven’t been warned; “You’re gonna miss these times,” “They grow up so fast!” But I generally dismissed these because the bulk of my excitement was either in the mere fact of having twin boys, or imagining playing with and teaching them when they were older. Somebody should have been more specific 😦

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